We are so excited to have a guest post from American Technologies. They are an industry leader in restoration, environmental remediation and reconstruction and an agency preferred vendor. They were gracious enough to share this important information about the Arizona monsoon’s. Thank you American Technologies (ATI) for always putting our customers first and being a true example of #integritymatters.

We’re in the beginning of June in the Old Pueblo, and that means the heat is with us, and there is a chance of some big MONSOON storms.

The Old Pueblo is a name the locals gave to Tucson, Arizona in the 19th century, and it’s a colloquialism that continues to resonate with the current residents. Maybe we should change the name of our Tucson branch office to Old Pueblo Technologies Inc. (a subsidiary of American Technologies Inc.)

Unfortunately that suggestion has been wisely and politely declined. Still, I can guarantee that any company with the name Old Pueblo in it always gets a few more phone calls… In the Old Pueblo we also have two seasons: Pleasant and the Monsoon.

The official monsoon season runs from June 15 to September 15, and therefore generally coincides with summer. During the monsoon, which is caused by the same phenomenon that brings Dallas, TX more days each year with 100 degree plus temperatures than Tucson; the winds carry moisture from the Gulf of Mexico up through the spine of Mexico and into Southern Arizona. Here the uplift caused by the Santa Rita, Rincon and Catalina mountains help generate the huge thunderstorms we’re grown to love.

Most days during the monsoon, you can generally count on some part of Southern and Eastern Arizona to have some rain – sometimes lots of rain – along with wind, lightning and even some hail.

The problem is, the local weather gurus can never really say for certain where and when these storms will actually occur.

But, since most of these storms come from the Southeast, if you see a big hunk of thunderstorm cloud heading your way from that direction, it’s time to batten down the hatches, sit tight, and call ATI for your repairs after the storm has passed or during if you need an emergency board up.

Thermal heating in late Spring and early Summer followed by a change in upper level air circulation patterns causes moisture from the Gulf of Mexico and the Gulf of California to penetrate Southern Arizona – and wham! Monsoon – 2 At ATI we are proud of the speed and expertise with which we respond to weather emergencies.

We are able to respond 24/7 handling jobs both large and small. We handle insurance claims of all sizes, and we’re often the first responder ready to assist with emergency services ranging from water extraction, roof tarp ups to tree removal. If you or your company would like additional information about the services ATI provides, including weather related emergency services, please let me know.

You can reach me at Kelley.Amey@atirestoration.com.

So, wherever you live in Tucson, or any other area in Arizona….July is a busy weather season, so remember to think cool, and stay indoors whenever a storm is approaching, and call ATI if things get a little too wet or hot (fire) – 1800-400-9353.

For more information, visit our website http://atirestoration.com/about